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log 6_2_94-6_23_94

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Date:         Thu, 2 Jun 1994 11:56:13 EDT
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         Patricia Jackson 
Subject:      Re: BOOK RESEARCH
exit
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Date:         Thu, 2 Jun 1994 20:27:11 -0400
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         "John P. (\"Jack\")" 
Subject:      Re: BOOK RESEARCH
In-Reply-To:  <9406021557.AA16319@solar.nova.edu>
sorry to hear that!
John P. Kirchner
kirchner@alpha.acast.nova.edu
On Thu, 2 Jun 1994, Patricia Jackson wrote:
> exit
>
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Date:         Mon, 6 Jun 1994 19:13:05 -0400
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         James Inman 
Subject:      Twain, Huxley, Orwell
Hi,
I am a new subscriber to the list and a graduate student at Valdosta
State University in Valdosta, Georgia.  I am about to begin my thesis,
and my topic deals with the relationship between the modern scientific
revolution, Twain's Connecticut Yankee, Huxley's Brave New World, and
Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.  If anyone out there has similar
interests
or great advice, please feel free to respond privately.  Thanks!
James Inman
jinman@grits.valdosta.peachnet.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 9 Jun 1994 11:49:09 -0400
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         "stephen a. thompson" 
Subject:      Re: Twain, Huxley, Orwell
In-Reply-To:  <199406070347.AA26904@northshore.ecosoft.com>
how do i un do this mail list..want out can anyone help!
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Date:         Thu, 9 Jun 1994 10:59:01 -0500
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         Joe Amato 
Subject:      Signoff...
All:  to signoff from this list, simply send a
SIGNOFF LITSCI-L
command, upper left-hand corner of message body, to
LISTSERV@VMD.CSO.UIUC.EDU
You'll receive a message confirming that you have unsubscribed.
Best,
Joe Amato
=========================================================================
Date:         Sun, 12 Jun 1994 16:23:57 -0500
Reply-To:     novabase@blkbox.COM
Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         xanim 
Subject:      Call For Participation
Below is a Call For Participation in a general brain base being
established with the cooperation of numerous individuals involved in
specialized activities.  We would be very pleased to have further
representation from your specialty.
Accord Services, Inc., with The Longevity Foundation, is
establishing an Internet-based archive to record the knowledge
(perceptions, attitudes, insights) of participating individuals.
This resource will be used in conjunction with specialized
software to coordinate creative problem solving for the persons
themselves as well as to provide innovative solutions for problems
involving differing groups of people.  All thinking men and women
are urged to join in this intelligent activity for the purpose of
improving life on Earth.
We have coined a word.  To brimble is to BRing IMagination
into Being for Longevity Effect, thus supplying brimblations
ranging from the simple to the complex, from the personal to the
global.  Yes, the various religions, tribes, personalities may
have good intentions, but there is no effective procedure whereby
they communicate harmoniously so as to act together constructively.
We live in a real, practical world, often involving unnecessary
violence.  Some 33 years ago, The Longevity Foundation was formed with
the idealistic mission to promote research in human survival, now
realized to be broadly dependent on the health of all life forms,
as well as the planet Earth itself.  Some 12 years ago, the powerful
methodology, GIST (Guided Inquiry System Technique), a balance of
analysis and intuition, was applied by the U.S. National Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA) to organize the first entry of plant
life into deep, outer space.
With Xanim's substantial relation to The Greatest All, he immediately
perceived the abundant benefits of joining these two, the goodwill of
Longevity and the practical power of GIST, and he brought them together
in the soul of Accord Services, Inc., managed as such not only for
profit
but also for the common good which naturally results (half the profits
will go the Foundation).  Accord then created the Brimbler Mind System
(BMS), which enables the Brimbler, assisted through GIST to make use of
both the left and the right brain, to correlate, generate, develop, and
document new ideas.
BMS, as further discussed in Brimbler GIST Tips (BGT), is suitable
both for individual and collaborative use.  Its major advantages are
that it is self-organizing, parallel, distributed, and scalable.
Collaboration may be through informal e-mail, phone call, meeting, or
formal local/wide-area networks.  Decision may be made to transfer
information from one level to another, further subdivide for future
correlation, revise for more accurate definition, or assign specific
responsibilities to others.  On selecting an issue for consideration,
the first step is to provide a small number of rubrics (terms),
preferably four.  One may rely on a previously created BMS template or
begin anew.  For example, we have the "Four Freedoms" of
speech, of
religion, from want, and from fear, included in the United Nations
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but they are taken, for the
most part, as ideals, meriting no more than lip-service.  BMS, in
correspondence with the worthy goals of The Longevity Foundation,
provides the means to take these freedoms seriously and use them to
resolve matters of worldly significance.
In summary, BMS provides the following:
a) information structured into patterns, appropriately
proportioned to minimize confusion and maximize comprehension;
b) overall perspective such that a single idea does not dominate
at expense of others equally as pertinent;
c) collective, associative collaboration between system and mind,
as well as among diverse Brimblers;
d) intuitive navigation through natural, conscious and
synchronistic, subconscious aspects toward achievement of
worthwhile, innovative results.
As a first step in what some, pessimistic or unknowing, will appraise
as a most ambitious, grandiose process, we are establishing a Brimbler
Brain Base (BBB) from "knowledge" of those with the
intelligence and
goodwill to respond to our initial Calls For Participation.  Remember,
however, that it is both intelligence AND goodwill which are required.
Brimblers must take an oath not to use the glorious capability herein
developed for any evil, destructive, violent end.  What we need from
you
is a commitment to proceed with us seriously as much as you are able,
in
good humor, of course, and without neglecting your health and family
responsibilities.  Sit down now, take a walk, if you like, but think
about how to describe what you can contribute, knowledge-wise, in four
topics suitable for inclusion in our BBB index.
It is planned that we will have, as necessary, all the paraphernalia of
the Internet, including formal mailing lists, newsgroups, bulletin
boards.  Longevity participants have access to diverse others of their
Brimbler ilk through the BBB.  They will receive Brimbler GIST Tips
(free) and get discounts on helpful Omega Publications (including The
Greatest All) and Accord Thinkware (including SuperGIST Software).
Neither of the latter is necessary for BBB participation.
Nor are donations to the Foundation required, but they are welcome,
with
donors receiving the planned monthly Longevity Newsletter, updating and
summarizing our worthwhile activities.  Foundation goals may be stated
as:
Express creative Intelligence through Imagination.
Experience effective Progress through Truth.
Exercise sensitive Morality through Love.
Exhibit decisive Perseverance through Will.
What we really would like is your "brain" broken down into
just four
arenas of mental expertise.  Now, maybe that can't be done, which is
OK.
Then, let's take something important to you, and you break that down
into four arenas wherein you might contribute.  We can give you another
four later, associated with another part of you.  But, in any event,
let's try to take one entity and present it "analytically",
i.e., so
it's "all" there, as far as your contribution is concerned,
broken down
into four.  GIST works best, both individually and interactively, if we
start out with four rubrics (arenas).  When we have such
"analyses" from
the numerous responding individuals, we can proceed to the next step,
including further discussion/explanation of newsletter and software
interactive benefits.  Not only will the interactions be worthwhile,
leading mayhap to innovation; they will be fun besides.
As specific examples of rubric selection, a United Nations staff member
contributed:
The United Nations
information technology
social futures
organizational change
a 13-year-old girl set forth:
astrophysics
computer science
mathematics
higher dimensions
a young sales manager chose:
sales/marketing
masonry
motorcycling
board games
a management consultant gave us:
work processes
behavior patterns
photography
politics
We must get people thinking together productively, not fighting
destructively.  I hope that I have gotten it over to you.  Please
send me your four topics through e-mail (xanim@blkbox.com).
Xanim
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 13 Jun 1994 18:01:33 -0400
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         B+R Samizdat Express 
Subject:      Internet-on-a-Disk, Issue #4, June 1994
INTERNET-ON-A-DISK #4,  June 1994
Newsletter of public domain and freely available electronic texts
Circulation:  direct = 2727, indirect (estimated) 100,000+
This newsletter is free for the asking.  To be added to the
distribution
list, please send requests to The B&R Samizdat Express
(samizdat@world.std.com).  Permission is granted to freely distribute
this newsletter in electronic form.
We plan to produce new issues about once a month.  We welcome
submissions of articles and information relating to availability of
electronic texts on the Internet and their use in education.
*************************************************
WHAT'S NEW
(texts recently made available by ftp, gopher, www, and LISTSERV)
from the Gutenberg Project --
ftp mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu /pub/etext/etext94
http://med-amsa.bu.ed/Gutenberg/welcome.html
$30,000 Bequest & Other Stories by Mark Twain (beqst10.txt)
A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson (child10.txt)
George Sand: Some Aspects of Her Life & Writings by Rene Doumic
(sandb10.txt)
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair (jungl10.txt)
The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle (lostw10.txt)
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (mansf10.txt)
The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy (mayrc10.txt)
Middlemarch by George Eliot (mdmar10.txt)
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo (trans. by Isabel Hapgood) (lesms10.txt)
Sara Crewe by Frances Hodgson Burnett (sara10.txt)
The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf (voout10.txt)
from wiretap
ftp 130.43.43.43  /Library/Classics/
Religious works by Ellen G. White
The Acts of the Apostles (acts.egw)
The Desire of Ages (desire.egw)
Patriarchs & Prophets (patriarchs.egw)
Prophets & Kings (prophets.egw)
The Great Controversy (controv.egw)
Susan Lenox:  Her Rise & Fall by David Graham Phillips (lenox.txt)
Ballads of a Cheechako by Robert Service (cheechak.txt)
Just David by Eleanor Porter (justdav.txt)
from the U.S. Dept. of Education
ftp ftp.ed.gov
gopher gopher.ed.gov
http://www.ed.gov
A search of what's new since May 1, 1994, yields a list of 404 items,
Some of these are book-length documents. Others are requests for
proposals for federal grant money (including one for Braille training
programs).   This resource is growing rapidly.  If  education is your
field, you should check here frequently.  Also, under ASK ERIC/
ERIC Digests File, the 1993 digests are finally available on-line.
from The Fourth World Documentation Project, Center for World
Indigenous Studies, Olympia, Washington
ftp.halcyon.com   /pub/FWDP
This archive contains information on indigenous peoples of the
Americas,
Africa, Asia, and the Pacific.  The documents include essays, position
papers, resolutions, speeches, and declarations.  Their largest
collection
(about 80 items) is found under /Americas.  The collection under
/International, which includes many UN documents, is also large. 
/Eurasia (a
couple dozen), /Oceania (a couple dozen), and /Africa (just half a
dozen,
dealing with North Africa) are just in the beginning stages.
from Baha'i World Centre
ftp  ftp.bwc.org  /bahai
A large set of religious writings related to the Baha'i Faith is now
available
on-line.  For now the texts are in English, but the site manager
indicates that
they should include other languages soon.
Two sites which are loaded with good electronic texts and which you
should
check regularly did not have anything new of note since our last issue:
Oxford Archive --  ftp ota.ox.ac.uk /ota/english/
Libellus Project --  ftp ftp.u.washington.edu  /pub/user-
supported/libellus/texts
***********************************************
SUGGESTION -- PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD
While very few K-12 schools have good Internet connections, nearly all
have PCs or Macintoshes.  And one of the best ways to introduce them
to the treasures of the Internet is by providing them with electronic
texts
on disks.  (That's a lot easier and cheaper than giving them
printouts.)
For those who do not have the capability or the time to retrieve
electronic
texts from the Internet, many are available at a nominal price from
PLEASE
COPY THIS DISK, a project of The B&R Samizdat Express.  For further
information, send email to samizdat@world.std.com
*********************************************************
SUGGESTED TACTICS FOR BUILDING AN ELECTRONIC LIBRARY
by Richard Seltzer, B&R Samizdat Express
The number and range of classic works of literature available for free
from
the Gutenberg Project, wiretap, the Oxford Archive, and others has
grown
to the point that they constitute not just a curious sampling, but the
beginnings of a major electronic library.
And, at the same time, the information resources available on the
Internet are
growing at an accelerated pace as the U.S. government and international
organizations such as the United Nations and NATO open up their files
for
free access.  Their Internet sites include up-to-date reference and
research
information that previously was very difficult to find and expensive to
obtain,
simply because paper is expensive.
For instance, Supreme Court decisions 1989-1994, which are now
available
for free in electronic form on the Internet, amount to about 22 Mbytes
of
information.  At about 800 pages per Mbyte, that amounts to over 17,000
pages, which at five cents per page, would  cost $850 to photocopy (not
including all the time wasted).
How can and should schools and libraries take advantage of the riches
available on the Internet?
A lot depends on what kind of access you have to the Internet.  If you
have Mosaic and Worldwide Web, with a fast connection (a T-1 line or
ISDN), and numerous PCs, Macintoshes, and/or workstations to
accommodate all comers, then you can maintain a "home page"
with pointers
to the best sites and starting points and search engines.  Then there's
no need
for you to download material for local access.  In that case, the
Internet
itself
is a vast extension of your library.  And, for the experienced user,
the
Internet becomes an extension of his or her own mind.  It can be quicker
and
easier to retrieve a text from Australia or Germany than to walk ten
feet and
take a book off a shelf.
Those of us who do not have that luxury, need to develop tactics to
make
the most of what we do have.
In most cases, our Internet connections are slow, and we have only one
or
just a few modem lines.  That means that if one person is busy
downloading
a huge file, others have to wait to get access.
In most cases, we do not have Mosaic and the Worldwide Web to enable us
to smoothly click our way through cyberspace.  Rather we rely on
printed
manuals to explain the older Internet commands and addresses, and to
help
us navigate through ftp and gopher directories.   So even though the
information we want is out there and for free, it may take hours to find
the
material we want when we want it.  And those of us who are experienced
find ourselves spending lots of time answering the numerous questions
of
novices.
In most cases, too, we don't have full Internet access.  We can only do
email,
or if we can do ftp and gopher, the disk space allotted to us is very
limited;
so once we've found the text, it may turn out to be too large for us to
download it.
That means we need to make choices about what information we want to
make available locally and what information to rely on the Internet
for.
If you have good enough access, fast enough connectivity, enough disk
space in your Internet account, and time to spare, you can and should
systematically download onto IBM/Macintosh diskettes the material that
you
know will be needed repeatedly.  Your selection might include such items
as
the CIA World Factbook, ERIC Digests and Supreme Court decisions, as
well as literary works.
If you aren't able to do that, you should consider purchasing diskettes
with
that same information from a service such as ours (PLEASE COPY THIS
DISK).
In either case, as you build your own local electronic library on
diskettes,
keep one set of masters in a safe place, and make a set of backup
diskettes
which you make generally available.  Encourage students and library
patrons
to make copies onto their own blank diskettes.   They can then do their
reading and research on their own machines, at their leisure, and
without
tying up your limited resources.
Public machines with access to the Internet can and should be dedicated
to
the use of people who are doing unique on-line research.  For them, you
would want to provide a good set of Internet reference guides (printed
books, as well as books on diskette) and access to experienced users
(perhaps a cadre of student volunteers) to help point them in the right
direction and reduce search time.  You also might want to keep a
notebook
where users can share useful tips with one another.
And when, in the course of their research, people find and download
large
files that could be useful to others, encourage them to make a copy and
add
it to your local electronic library.
There are many possible ways to build and run your local electronic
library.
Just remember that if  you have limited resources for Internet
connection,
you don't want those lines constantly busy with people repeatedly
retrieving
the same documents, or downloading large files.  The Internet should be
used for unique searches, and the library should build a collection of
the best
and most useful material on diskettes.
POSTSCRIPT --
AVOIDING GOPHER HOLES, AND OTHER INTERNET HAZARDS
While information produced by the U.S. government is public domain by
definition, the copyright status of  classic works of literature found
on the
Internet can be problematic.  In this beautiful, anarchic culture that
we all
benefit from, different people have different standards of what they
believe is
right and fair, which do not necessarily correspond with the opinions
of
judges, who themselves are not in agreement on these matters.
I am not a lawyer.  I'm a firm believer in freedom of expression and in
the
importance of making public information freely available to the public. 
I'm
concerned that doubts regarding copyright status of material on the
Internet
could seriously restrict the systematic use of it by libraries.  And I
believe
that if people deal fairly and openly with one another, treat one
another with
respect, and exercise due caution and common sense, we can all get
along
well together without the need for lawyers.
As a general rule, material published before 1918 is now in the public
domain.  But translations and scholarly editions of such works which
were
published since then may still be under copyright protection.  Also
compilations/anthologies of otherwise  public domain material can be
copyrighted.
Today, you can scan a book with relatively inexpensive equipment and
software, putting it into an electronic form which you can then
distribute on
CD ROM or diskette, or send by email, or post in an electronic bulletin
board system, or in ftp, gopher, or www files.  And it is a relatively
easy
matter to upload from CD ROM to the Internet or download from the
Internet to diskette.  And some ftp and gopher sites let users add
material to
their archives with little or no oversight.  When you find a book on
the
Internet, it may be virtually impossible to determine how the electronic
came
into existence and what paper edition it derives from.
To further complicate matters, the courts have been ambiguous regarding
whether the mechanical act of scanning gives any rights to the person
or
company does that work.
As a practical matter, for one-time, personal use, these legal
complications
probably make no difference.  But if a school or library begins to
systematically download material and encourages widespread copying of
it,
that's a different matter.
Does that mean that a school or library that wants to build a local
electronic
library of diskettes with material from the Internet should limit itself
to just
government information?  No, but someone in authority should  review
and
approve material before it becomes part of the "official"
collection.  And that
reviewer should make sure that the source is known and trusted.
A recent query from a blind reader in Canada brought this point home to
me.
She was interested in building an electronic library, as described
above, and
was asking for advice.  She also was kind enough to point me to a
gopher
site which I hadn't mentioned in this newsletter and which has an
extremely
rich collection of classic literary texts.  Starting at nstn.ca, she
had
wandered
through gopher space (selecting 5, 3, 5, 1, 14, and 3) and found herself
with
a set of material which she believed was "from Vermont".
I followed the path she had indicated, and indeed arrived at that same
collection.  Using the command "=" I found out that the site
where it was
located was indeed gopher.vt.edu.  Going back to my system prompt, the
command gopher gopher.vt.edu brought me to their main gopher site, 
which
turned out to be Virginia Tech, not Vermont. And using the port number
10010 brought me directly to the electronic texts.
Since most of the material there is not available from the major sites
of
literary electronic texts, which historically are very careful about
copyright
matters (Gutenberg, wiretap, Oxford, and Libellus), I sent a query to
the
gopher administrator at Virginia Tech.  She replied that the material
had
been uploaded from a CD ROM which they got from Walnut Creek.  She
also gave me their phone number.  I contacted Walnut Creek and found
out
that they had not copyrighted that CD ROM, and that they do not believe
that the act of scanning a public domain text should give anyone
special
rights to it.  But that particular CD ROM ("the desk top
library") is no
longer for sale.  It contained materials that they had obtained from
the
Internet, not by scanning.   And they withdrew it for "legal
reasons."
Walnut Creek pointed out that they also publish a CD ROM of texts from
the Gutenberg Project, and that they have had no problems with that
one.
(If you would like information about their products, you can reach them
at
velte@cdrom.com).
One could take the position that  even if a compilation is copyrighted,
if the
individual items are in the public domain, then you should be able to
make
free use of them individually.  But until the courts decide whether the
work
of  scanning and proofreading gives anyone special rights to a
particular
electronic version, libraries would be well advised to make sure they
know
its origin before encouraging systematic copying.
*********************************************************
CLARIFICATION -- AUTHORS & THE INTERNET
by Richard Seltzer, B&R Samizdat Express
(Several writers expressed concern over my views regarding electronic
rights
and the public domain, published in the May issue .  The following is
an
abbreviated version of my response to them.)
I myself am an author.  And the fact remains that most authors only
receive
token sums for their work and would welcome an opportunity to reach a
wider audience.
Many of us are caught up in some Horatio Alger myth.  A handful of
writers make it big, and the rest of us put up with a system that makes
it
very difficult for us to ever reach an audience, on the hope that we
will
someday be lucky.
Keep in mind that I am not talking about computer documentation, or the
kind of writing that corporations pay you to do.  I am talking about
the
publishing industry -- articles and books that you write not on
contract,
but on the hope that you will be able to sell them to a publisher.
Have you been published?  And if so, was the amount you were paid in
any
way commensurate with the work that went into it?
My main message is that the ability to distribute electronic texts over
the Internet changes the rules of the publishing game.  Don't take it
for
granted that the old rules and old model still apply.  If you sell a
book, hang onto the electronic rights (so you can do with them what you
will in the future) or make the publisher pay something substantial for
them (above what they would normally pay you).
You can make money selling the paper print rights and make the
electronic
version available for free to reach a broader audience.  Or you can use
the
Internet to give new life to a book of yours which publishers have
dropped
from print.  Or you can give first life to a work that dozens or
hundreds of
people need or would enjoy but which would never be published
traditionally
because it wouldn't sell enough copies.
I strongly believe in the rights of authors.  I also believe that
authors have
been abused by publishers for centuries, and that this new technology
gives
us interesting options we never had before.
**********************************************************
THE INTERNET -- A NEW DIMENSION
by Richard Seltzer, B&R Samizdat Express
(I was recently honored at Internet World in San Jose, for a
three-minute
Internet video which I produced as part of my "day job."  I
used the occasion
to make a statement of my deeply held, personal beliefs regarding the
nature
and potential of the Internet.  Attached are those remarks.)
I'm honored to be here with people who helped make the Internet what it
is today and who will shape its future.
My videotape is a quick look at what is happening today with Mosaic and
the Worldwide Web.  It avoids talk about highways and distance, and
tries
to show the immediacy of a user's experience.
Mosaic brings the world to your desktop.  It makes the resources of the
Internet feel like an extension of your own mind.
And if you have something to say or show, the Worldwide Web lets you
open up and invite a global audience to share your creations and follow
the
threads of your thought.
This environment feels like the grand concourse of a global mall, where
millions congregate to learn and share experiences and to do business.
The Internet has long been a great way to meet people -- to hear all
views and to have your say.  It has been a pioneer environment of
sharing
and caring, where strangers often help one another, with no expectation
of payment or reward.
Today, some people on the Internet are frightened by the rapid growth
and
change and the coming of commerce.  They talk about a land rush, and
barbed wire, and the end of the open range.
But the Internet is not a limited, fixed space to be carved up by
competing commercial interests.
Rather, it is a different dimension, where you can be everywhere at
once,
without moving.  Every individual and every company that connects to
the
Internet expands and enriches it, and at the same time becomes part of
the Internet and is changed by it.
Let's welcome the growth and grow with it.  Let's help shape a future
that continues to amaze and inspire us all.
***********************************
Back issues are available from us on request, and are also found in the
archives of Computer underground Digest (CuD), housed at the Electronic
Frontier Foundation:
ftp  ftp.eff.org  /pub/Publications/CuD/Internet_on_a_Disk
gopher  gopher.eff.org  /Publications/CuD/Internet_on_a_Disk
http://www.eff.org/pub/Publications/CuD/Internet_on_a_Disk
They are also found at such sites as:
gopher sjuvm.stjohns.edu /Disabilities & Rehabilitation Resources/
/EASI/EASI's list of available Internet etexts
You are welcome to include this publication on your ftp or gopher or
webserver.  Please let us know the address, and we'll add it to this
list.
Published by PLEASE COPY THIS DISK, The B&R Samizdat Express,
PO Box 161, West Roxbury, MA 02132.  samizdat@world.std.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 13 Jun 1994 22:32:57 -0700
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         Stephen Ogden 
Subject:      literary querie
Hello: can anyone give the reference to this passage from Proust's
_Remembrance_?
> Okay, here is the question.  I'm trying to find the passage where
the
> narrator is musing over the effects of technology on people's
> expectations.  In short (if anything in Remembrance *can* be
short),
> the fact that people could easily communicate by use of the
telephone
> means that if they don't, it is more insulting or thoughtless than
when
> there were no telephones.  I think the narrator was back in town,
being
> stood up by someone (possibly Gilberte) and that it was somewhere
in
> the first volume or so.  Thanks for any help.
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 22 Jun 1994 13:06:06 EDT
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         John Greenway 
Subject:      Galileo on hypercard
I plan to update one of my annual assignments for a sophomore Honors
class,
having the students collaborate on a hypercard presentation of the
Galileo
trial.  It seems like an interesting way  to present background,
primary
sources, secondary materials and relevant philosophical and ethical
issues
(theory and hypothesis vs. fact, education, etc.).  I plan to combine
indi-
vidual assignments such as retrograde motion, the Council of Trent,
Milton's
cosmology, Donne's "Anatomie of the World" with interactive
entries commenting
upon contemporary offshoots: Creationism, "feminist science,"
and the like.
Before I pester the Computing Center again, I'd appreciate any
comments,
suggestions or recommendations.
Thanks,
John Greenway
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY 40513
ENGJLG@UKCC.UKY.EDU
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 22 Jun 1994 10:50:25 PDT
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         Neil Rest 
Subject:      Re: Galileo on hypercard
A couple of years ago, Scientific American did a very interesting
article
on the legitimate epistomological issues of the famous trial.  Sorry I
can't
cite it more specificly off the top of my head, but it should be easy
to
find in thr Readers' Guide, and would do ver well on your basic
bibliography
(Scientific American articles, in turn, have excellent bibliographies. .
. ).
Neil
=========================================================================
Date:         Thu, 23 Jun 1994 16:22:55 -0400
Reply-To:     "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

Sender:       "Society for Literature and Science - philos.,
tech.,
cyber discussion" 

From:         Guedon Jean-Claude 
Subject:      Re: Galileo on hypercard
In-Reply-To:  <199406230154.AA18683@condor.CC.UMontreal.CA> from
"John
Greenway" at Jun 22, 94 01:06:06 pm
>
> I plan to update one of my annual assignments for a sophomore
Honors class,
> having the students collaborate on a hypercard presentation of the
Galileo
> trial.  It seems like an interesting way  to present background,
primary
> sources, secondary materials and relevant philosophical and ethical
issues
> (theory and hypothesis vs. fact, education, etc.).  I plan to
combine indi-
> vidual assignments such as retrograde motion, the Council of Trent,
Milton's
> cosmology, Donne's "Anatomie of the World" with
interactive entries commenting
> upon contemporary offshoots: Creationism, "feminist
science," and the like.
> Before I pester the Computing Center again, I'd appreciate any
comments,
> suggestions or recommendations.
Don't forget Pietro Redondi's book, Galileo eretico translated into
anumber
of languages, as well as Franco Lo chiatto and Sergio Marconi, Galilee
entre
le pouvoir et le savoir (translated from the Italian) (Paris, Alinea,
1988).
Best,
Jean-Claude Guedon
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jean-Claude Guedon                              Tel. 514-343-6208
Professeur titulaire                            Fax: 514-343-2211
Departement de litterature comparee             Surfaces
Universite de Montreal                          Tel. 514-343-5683
C.P. 6128, Succursale "A"                       Fax.
514-343-5684
Montreal, Qc H3C 3J7                            ftp ftp.umontreal.ca
Canada                                          guedon@ere.umontreal.ca
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------