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2002 Winter

Winter 2002
vol.11, no.4


INVITATION: GEORGIA TECH MLA RECEPTION 12/29/02


All SLS members are invited to the Georgia Tech LCC reception at the
Modern Language Association meeting in New York. The Georgia Tech
reception will be held Sunday, December 29, 2002, from 7pm to 9 pm in
Ken Knoespel's suite at the Le Parker Meridien Hotel (118 West 57th
St.; 212-245-5000). Email RSVPS by December 22 to Carol Colatrella at
carol.colatrella@lcc.gatech.edu.



CALL FOR PAPERS: SLS2003, AUSTIN, TEXAS



The 17th annual conference of the Society for Literature and Science
will be held at the Marriott at the Capitol in Austin, Texas, on
October 23-26, 2003. The general conference theme is Rethinking
Space and Time Across Science, Literature, and the Arts. Plenary talks
will address recent developments in cosmology.



Austin offers many attractions, including excellent restaurants and the
lively music scene on 6th Street (within walking distance of the
Marriott).
The conference will coincide with the major exhibition "Becoming
Modern: 1890-1939," marking the opening of the expanded facilities
of
the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC) at the University
of Texas, and the HRC will host a reception in the exhibition before
Friday night's plenary lecture. In addition to its strong history of
science
collections, the HRC features manuscripts and archival materials for
British, French, and American authors that are outranked only by the
Library of Congress and the New York Public Library (see
http://www.hrc.utexas.edu). Arrangements are being made to extend the
conference rate two days before and after the conference for those
wishing to spend additional time in Austin.



Although the conference will be focused on the themes of space and
time in many of its sessions, proposals are also welcome on topics
addressing the interaction of literature, the arts, new media, or
critical
theory with science and technology.



Individuals may submit abstracts (150 words) for individual papers as
well as proposals for panels, usually composed of 3-4 speakers plus
discussion in a 1-1/2 hour session. We encourage innovative proposals
for papers, panels, round-table discussions, and any non-traditional
formats. Sessions involving speakers and/or respondents that transcend
disciplinary boundaries are particularly welcome. The deadline is
March 31, 2003.



Abstracts and panel proposals should be e-mailed to both program chair
Bruce Clarke, Texas Tech University <bruce.clarke@ttu.edu>, and
conference co-director Linda Dalrymple Henderson, UT/Austin
<dnehl@mail.utexas.edu>. If preferred, paper versions of
abstracts/panel proposals may be mailed to Bruce Clarke, Dept. of
English, TTU, Lubbock, TX 79409-3091. A Web site providing additional
program and registration information will be established early in 2003
at
<http://english.ttu.edu/sls2003/sls2003.htm>.



Travel Awards for SLS2003


SLS provides a limited number of travel awards for underfunded
individuals attending the annual conference. Members of SLS who
participate in the annual conference may apply for travel subventions.
An applicant should email name, title of SLS presentation, any
information about funding for the conference, and an indication of how
long one has been a member to Carol Colatrella at  by September 1.
SLS officers will review the applications and approve funds for one to
three individuals. Each person awarded funds will be presented with a
$200 check at the conference.




2003 Bruns Essay Prize

The Bruns Graduate Essay Prize, in honor of Edward F. Bruns, is
awarded annually to the best essay written by a graduate student
member of the Society for Literature and Science. Graduate students
wishing to have their essays considered for the $250 prize should
submit them by September 1 to N. Katherine Hayles, Department of
English, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1530.


 


2003 Schachterle Essay Prize

Lance Schachterle, SLS founding president, has established an annual
prize of $250 in honor of his parents to recognize the best new essay
on
literature and science written in English by a nontenured scholar.
Eligible authors wishing to submit essays (published or accepted for
publication) should send them prior to September 1 to the SLS
Executive Director, Carol Colatrella, LCC, Georgia Institute of
Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0165; please label envelope
"Schachterle Submission."


Note: SLS travel  awards and essay prizes are presented during the
Business Meeting of the annual fall conference. One may submit only
one entry to one of the two essay prize competitions.



ALL PARTICIPANTS IN SLS2003 MUST BE SLS MEMBERS FOR THE
2003 MEMBERSHIP YEAR. CONTACT JOHNS HOPKINS
UNIVERSITY PRESS, JOURNALS DIVISION TO JOIN, RENEW, OR
CHECK MEMBERSHIP STATUS.  SEE BACK PAGE OF THIS
NEWSLETTER FOR HOPKINS PRESS JOURNALS DIVISION
CONTACT INFORMATION.
SLS 2002, LOS ANGELES, CONFERENCE REPORT



Combined Minutes of Executive Board and Business Meetings


President's Report by Hugh Crawford included announcing the results
of  2002 elections and introducing incoming member-at-large Ursula
Heise (replacing Bruce Clarke) and incoming 2nd Vice-President Bruce
Clarke (replacing Eve Keller, who will become 1st V-P, with Jay
Labinger
becoming President).



Financial Report presented by Carol Colatrella is included in this
issue.

CONFERENCES:
SLS 2002, Los Angeles: Jay Labinger was thanked
for his hard work in organizing the meeting.


SLS 2002, Aarhus: Attendees reported on the successful Danish SLS
conference.


SLS 2004, Paris: Yves Abrioux and Noelle Batt shared plans about the
third international SLS conference to be held in April 2004 in Paris.


SLS 2003, Austin: Bruce Clarke and Linda Henderson distributed the
call for papers enclosed in this issue.


SLS JOURNAL: Hugh Crawford and Jim Bono reported on their plans
putting the journal Configurations back on schedule and on its healthy
financial state.


SLS WEBSITE & CONFIGURATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY: Sue Hagedorn
welcomes assistance with both projects.  Email her at hagedors@vt.edu


Carol Colatrella was reappointed as Executive Director to serve
2002-2004.  She also reported for editors Kate Hayles and Stephanie
Smith on the most recent books published in the University of Michigan
Press/SLS Book Series: David Cassuto, Dripping Dry: Literature,
Politics, and Water in the Desert; Duncan Kennedy, Rethinking Reality:
Lucretius and the Textualization of Nature; Laura Otis, Networking:
Communicating with Bodies and Machines in the Nineteenth-Century;
Arkady Plotnitsky, The Knowable and the Unknowable: Modern Science,
Nonclassical Thought and the "Two Cultures."  Eduardo Kac's
Telepresence and Bio Art: Networking Humans, Rabbits, and Robots is
forthcoming.



AWARDS AND PRIZES


2002 Travel Awards were presented to Stephanie Hawkins, Liz Hutter,
Srikanth Maliavarapu, Paula Viterbo, Gordon Hadfield, Cheryl Koski,
Elizabeth Neswald, and Benjamin Robertson.



Eve Keller awarded the 2002 Bruns Essay Prize (for the best essay
written by a graduate student member of SLS) to Benjamin Cohen of
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for his essay
"The
Element of the Table: Reading and Representing the Visual Discourse
of Chemical Practices."  The judge's citation noted that "the
chemical
tables are shown in Mr. Cohen's essay to constitute visually-based
heuristic tools employed in the construction of science."



Hugh Crawford awarded the 2002 Schachterle Essay Prize (for the
best published or forthcoming essay written by an untenured SLS
member) to Sujata Iyengar of the University of Georgia for
"Royalist,
Romancist, Racialist: Rank, Gender, and Race in the Science and
Fiction of Margaret Cavendish," soon to appear in ELH.  Iyengar's
essay
examines "the incongruous juxtaposition of [Cavendish's]
scientific/philosophical text Observations with her romantic utopia
Blazing World,"  relating their joint publication to "her
desire for
alternative conceptions of race, gender, and religion."



THE WRAPUP DISCUSSION AT THE END OF THE SLS
CONFERENCE IS AN SLS TRADITION ENCOURAGING MEMBERS
TO REVIEW THE CONFERENCE AND SLS PROCEDURES.
WRAPUP NOTES FOR SLS2002, LOS ANGELES
by Eve Keller, 1st Vice-President:
Conference schedule: Moderators were urged to stick to the order of
panelists as listed in the program. Many liked the Thursday night
session a good idea, as it allows people to get into conversations at
the
very start of the conference.  Participants also thought one plenary
good
idea, along with follow-up sessions. announce at start that chairs MUST
hold speakers to time restrictions to ensure time for discussion in
every
session.



Panel organization: It was suggested that seminars with thought pieces
ought to be sent round in advance on email, then discussed at
conference in round table. Another format that people are interested in
is a bulletin board to arrange panels, although it didn't work out this
time.



Abstract book: List disciplinary affiliations of participants in
abstract
book. Short abstracts in program worked well; it was recommended to
use a 150-word abstract both for proposal and for abstract book, so
that
each participant won't have to write two separate abstracts and
organizers won't have to wait till last minute to get them.



Conference events: Some questioned whether the Saturday dance is
an absolute necessity? People at the meeting thought that in town that
has a lot of alternatives, some felt such an event was not required,
although a few people said the dance is to them an integral part of
SLS.
One suggestion recommended organizing poster sessions; some
thought they'd work particularly well at a reception.



Welcoming new members: Conference organizers were encouraged toh on
arrange meeting places/times for new members or for those who aren't
hooked up for meals (ie find ways for people to get together socially
if
they don't already know people at SLS).



Conference amenities: Conference participants REALLY liked that
Caltech provided in each room the following items: bandaids; kleenex;
tylenol; markers. Someone asked that caffeinated soda be provided in
the mornings.



Recruitment suggestions: Some encouraged recruiting more people
from the arts and from neuroscience; Greg Garvey volunteered to assist
with mailing lists.  There was some discussion of a name change for
SLS, but most felt the organization already has name recognition.  It
was
suggested that there ought to be a registry of all organizations that
SLS
members join; those organizations should be invited to advertise SLS
conferences in their newsletters.  There was a general feeling that it
would be good to bring in more members, but that, on the whole, small
is
better (ie people like a conference of 200 or so participants).



Publicity: Conference organizers are reminded to send any publicity
materials to Noelle Batt and Yves Abrioux to be disseminated in Europe.
Put announcement of Paris conference in Configurations.  Send
"review
copies" of Configurations to select associations in Europe.



Society for Literature and Science, Financial Report for 2001-2002
Prepared by Carol Colatrella, Executive Director, November 1, 2002



Click here to view the financial report for 2001-2002



ON RETENTION AND RECRUITMENT OF MEMBERS

by Arkady Plotnitsky, Member-at-large


 Although SLS is a healthy and prospering organization, retention
and recruitment unavoidably remain our important tasks, which
continuously demand new ideas and new ways of implementing and
disseminating them, as both SLS and the world around it, in the
academy and beyond, change. Decodings and the Executive Board
invite opinions and suggestions (general and specific) from the SLS
members. As an impetus, here are some among the ideas that have
been discussed during the last meeting in Pasadena (including at the
Board meeting and the closing business meeting). First, we should more
proactively expand some among the areas already present and
extending the reach of the organization to new areas, such as public
health and disabilities studies; digitalization and its relations to art
and
media; neurosciences; and mathematics. Second, while we want to
maintain the distinct character of SLS, vis-a-vis related
organizations,
we want to interact with such organizations and, in particular, make
their
members more aware of the work we do, especially of our conferences,
here and in Europe, and Configurations. It was suggested, in this
context and in general, that we should disseminate, digitally and 
otherwise, the Configurations logo within and beyond SLS. Third, we
should continue to work on expanding the presence and role of
scientists in SLS. Inviting them more often as plenary speakers, as we
have done this year and as we plan to do in Austin, is one way to
pursue
this task. We also want to attract a broader participation of faculty
and
graduate students from major universities, such as Ivy league schools,
which are at present underrepresented in SLS. Our presence at the MLA
helps this task already, since it has attracted a number of major
scholars, not previously the SLS members, as speakers. Finally, by way
of a concrete suggestion, we might consider designing a nice poster
advertising SLS 2003/Austin (which may also contain the Configurations
logo). The poster could be mailed to all participants and to
departments
in the humanities and science in the region to attract regional
interests,
as well as distributed at the conference itself so it can be posted
both
before and after conference in schools across the country and in
Europe. We hope that these ideas can stimulate further thinking and
discussion concerning retention and recruitment. Please mail/email your
ideas to Arkady Plotnitsky Professor of English Director Theory and 
Cultural Studies Program Department of English Purdue University West
Lafayette, IN 47907 email:  APlotnit@sla.purdue.edu



CALL FOR PAPERS: FEMINIST THEORY



Special Issue: Feminist Theory and/of Science
Guest Editor: Susan M. Squier



Articles are invited that consider the relations between feminist
theory
and science, as well as feminist theories of science. Essays may vary
in
subject area and methodology. Literary, historical, and/or visual and
cultural studies approaches, sociological and anthropological
approaches, as well as perspectives from the scientific disciplines,
are
encouraged. Possible subjects of exploration include: feminist theory
and the biological body and brain; the limits of materiality; the limits
of
social construction; feminist theories of information and communication
technology (ICT); is there a feminist science? Is there a scientific
feminism? Discourses of science and feminist theory; feminist science
studies or queer science studies: what are the differences? What is the
role of literature in feminist theory / in feminist science studies?
How
does feminist theory respond to the risk society? How does feminism
understand the categories of gender, race, class, disability, and/or
species as they are constituted and/ or deployed in scientific practice?
Is
a 'non-modern' feminist science studies possible? What are the
essential texts for feminist theory of science? What practices
characterize feminist science studies or the feminist theory of
science?



Feminist Theory is a peer-reviewed journal and all articles will be
subject
to the usual refereeing process. Six copies should be submitted.
Author's names and biographical notes should appear only on a cover
sheet, and all identifiers in the text should be masked so that
manuscripts can be reviewed anonymously. Each article should be
accompanied by an abstract and keywords and a brief biographical note.
Articles should be typed double spaced, with references in the Harvard
Style and substantive footnotes at the end of the article. Manuscript
length should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words. This special issue will
review only unpublished manuscripts that are not simultaneously under
review for publication elsewhere.



Detailed notes for contributors are available on request from the
Feminist Theory office; email address: feminist.theory@york.ac.uk Other
inquiries should be directed to the issue editor by e-mail, at
sxs62@psu.edu



Deadline for submissions: December 15, 2003.


Manuscripts should be clearly marked 'Special Issue' and sent either to
Feminist Theory, Centre for Women's Studies, University of York,
Heslington, York YO10 5DD or, in the case of North American authors,
to Susan Squier, PO Box 557, 211 Miller Lane, Boalsburg, PA 16827,
USA.



Susan Squier is Brill Professor of Women's Studies and English at the
Pennsylvania State University, where she is a member of the Science,
Medicine, Technology and Culture group and the Disability Studies
group of the Rock Ethics Institute. She has served as President of the
SLScience, and is currently on its Executive Board.



Among her publications are: Babies in Bottles: Twentieth-Century
Visions of Reproductive Technology, Playing Dolly: Technocultural
Formations, Fantasies and Fictions of Assisted Reproduction (edited
with E. Ann Kaplan), Arms and the Woman: War, Gender, and Literary
Representation (co-edited with Helen Cooper and Adrienne Munich).
Her edited collection, Communities of the Air: Radio Century, Radio
Culture, is forthcoming in 2003 from Duke University Press. In summer
2002, she co-directed (with Anne Hunsaker Hawkins) the National
Endowment for the Humanities summer institute on "Literature,
Medicine
and Culture" at Penn State University Hershey Medical Center.



EXCERPTS FROM CONFERENCE REPORT ON SLS2002, AARHUS,
MAY 8-12, 2002, published in Anglistik: Mitteilungen des Deutschen
Anglistenverbandes. 13.Jahrgang.Heft 2.September 2002: 184-186, by
Alexandra Lembert, Leipzig, who also summarized some presentations:



	
		"The second [international SLS] conference was recently held at
the
	University of Aarhus, placing special emphasis on the experimenting
	arts and sciences.  The conference attracted nearly 200 scholars from
	all around the world.  But while speakers from Scandinavia, the US,
	Great Britain and Germany were particularly numerous, guests from
	Eastern Europe were unfortunately rare."   . . .
	"The following conference extracts represent only a small number
of
	the presentations, the topics of which ranged widely.  What will be
	missing most from this account, however, is a description of the
friendly
	atmosphere resulting from the excellent organization of the conference
	by the Aarhus committee." . . .